“Red and Yellow, Black and White?”

It’s cherry season again. That wonderful and fleeting time of year when juicy deliciousness can be plucked from a tree! Walking through the orchard today, looking at the crop, I got that old Sunday School song going through my head. And I can’t seem to get rid of it. “Red and Yellow, Black and White. They are precious in His sight…” There. Now it is stuck in your head too!

The song came up because of the different colors of sweet cherries we grow. They are so pretty hanging in clusters on the trees right now. There are black ones, red ones, and yellow ones(that have the name White Gold). That’s where the white comes in. Each one has a distinct flavor that distinguishes it from the others. And that variety makes it fun to mix and match them.

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Cherries are not native to America. So how did they get here? I remember learning about Johnny Appleseed in school, but I don’t recall being taught about Johnny Cherryseed. Must have skipped class that day. Actually, the seeds were brought over from Europe in 1628 to the settlement at Plymouth, Massachusetts. First planted there, they were brought west as the colonies expanded and eventually made it all the way to the northwest coast, where they flourished.

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Michigan is well known for cherries. It is quite likely that seeds were brought here by French colonists coming through the St. Lawrence Seaway. But however they got here, this state has perfect conditions for growing cherries. Michigan grows about 75% of the nation’s tart cherries, and about 40% of the sweet cherries. In fact, Traverse City is known as the Cherry Capital of the world! And cherries are good for you. They contain lots of anti-oxidants and are helpful in relieving pain and helping you sleep better. All on top of that juicy-licious (is that a word?) taste! The perfect fruit? Maybe!

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Our cherry season begins on Saturday, July 1. If you have never picked a fresh cherry from a tree, you owe it to yourself to experience the fun and flavor. And if you are a cherry picking veteran, well, you know just how delicious they are. The season goes fast, so don’t miss it! I know I’ll eat my share! So come out to the farm in the next couple of weeks and….

Have a FRUITFUL day!

Tom Moelker

 

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We’re being invaded!!

Things are always changing in the orchard. Some changes are good, like new varieties and plantings. But some changes can be difficult to deal with. Over the last few years two new invasive species have appeared in the USA and moved from south to north. The are in Michigan now, and they have an appetite for fruit! And that’s a change we growers are going to have to deal with.

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Spotted Winged Drosophila

The first is the Spotted Winged Drosophila (SWD). That in itself is a mouthful. SWD is a fruit fly, not unlike the common fruit flies that everyone has seen hanging out in your house or at the produce department. You know that fruit flies like over-ripe fruit and fruit with a cut or a bad spot in it. That’s OK. We didn’t really plan on eating that bad fruit anyway, right? But that is where the SWD differs from your run of the mill fruit fly. You see, the Spotted Winged Drosophila likes nice sound fruit that is still hanging on the tree, vine or bush.  And that presents a problem. Because we don’t like bugs in our fruit, and neither do you! These little pests can go from egg to adult in as little as 8 days! So they have the potential to really disrupt the small fruit crops like raspberries, blueberries and cherries. We will have to find ways to control them at a very critical time–from just before the fruit is ripe to when you pick it! We are working on a fix for this invader. In the meantime, we have traps in our orchards to detect them when they arrive, and Michigan State University is providing us with research and information.

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Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The second unwelcome guest in our orchards is the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB). These bugs have been moving into Michigan over the last 5 years or so. They originated in Asia and apparently hitch-hiked here some years ago. The BMSB likes to chew on apples and peaches later in the summer and throughout the fall. Which once again presents a problem for growers and consumers of our fine Michigan fruits! Usually by August the pests that like apples have run their course for the year. But that is just when the BMSB is getting ramped up and hungry! And they can really do some damage when they are hungry! So like SWD, we are trapping for the Stink Bugs (aptly named I think). And when they show up we will be waiting for them. And hopefully we will be ready.

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BMSB damage on apples

So what do we do with these alien invaders? Building a wall won’t help because they can fly. And we can’t check them at the border either. They are already here, so we will have to have to deal with them. But, by working with scientists and biologists, we will find a way to solve the problem and continue to get those delectable apples and sweet cherries to you. Without surprises.

Have a fruitful week!

Tom Moelker

 

“Should I stay or should I go?”

That is what the apples and other fruits on our trees are asking lately. Now that the bloom is finished and the fruitlets are growing, we enter a period known to fruit growers by a very technical term:”June drop”.  No, really that’s the name! It is the period which usually occurs in early to mid June, during which the fruits either terminate and fall off, or continue to grow into mature fruit. It occurs in all of the different fruits that we grow.

But how is that decision made? And can we tell exactly which will stay and which will go? Well, eventually we will know what is left, but for now we have some clues that can help us estimate the crop. In an earlier blog I wrote about Gibberilins, those plant hormones that help the apples communicate with the trees, and vice versa. Gibberilins are produced in the seeds of the apple, and the amount of them that are coursing through the tree help the tree “know” how many apples are on it. But not every apple on the tree after bloom has seeds in it. If the blossom wasn’t pollinated or the process didn’t fully complete, the seeds may not have been made. Most times those fruitlets without seeds won’t stay on the tree. Some apples will have just a seed or two on one side. Many times those will fall off too, but if perchance they stay on and grow, they will be misshapen, one side will be bigger than the other.

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Stress plays a role too. Not the stress that us growers are under, but the stress that the trees experience. Stress can be caused by drought, extreme heat, or an excessive number of fruits on the tree. Any of these can cause the tree to compensate by kicking some fruits off so it can better support the ones that are left. That is where the Gibberilins come in.

So how does the crop look this year? Well, we are still waiting for it to sort itself out. Some years what looks like a full crop dwindles greatly during June drop. In other years too many apples stay on and we spend a lot of time thinning them off by hand to improve quality. As you can see in the photos, there are all different sizes on the trees right now. Some smallest ones certainly will fall off by themselves. And the largest, healthiest ones should stay on and grow. But the jury is still out on those middle sized ones. Many of those that we cut open have no seeds, or the seeds are drying up. But others look just fine inside. What are we to do? We wait.

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Different sizes on the trees right now.


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The top 3 have dead or no seeds. Bottom 2 look good!

The same process occurs in our pears, plums and cherries too. Pears are finished and they look good! Cherries and plums are very close to completing the June drop and they look plentiful too. Peaches? They usually need a lot of hand thinning every year. A toilsome task in all it’s fuzziness (also see a earlier blog!). We are thinning peaches now. But apples will be sorting themselves out during the next couple of weeks and asking themselves: “Should I stay or should I go?” Stay tuned and we will all find out!

Have a fruitful week!

Tom Moelker