“Should I stay or should I go?”

That is what the apples and other fruits on our trees are asking lately. Now that the bloom is finished and the fruitlets are growing, we enter a period known to fruit growers by a very technical term:”June drop”.  No, really that’s the name! It is the period which usually occurs in early to mid June, during which the fruits either terminate and fall off, or continue to grow into mature fruit. It occurs in all of the different fruits that we grow.

But how is that decision made? And can we tell exactly which will stay and which will go? Well, eventually we will know what is left, but for now we have some clues that can help us estimate the crop. In an earlier blog I wrote about Gibberilins, those plant hormones that help the apples communicate with the trees, and vice versa. Gibberilins are produced in the seeds of the apple, and the amount of them that are coursing through the tree help the tree “know” how many apples are on it. But not every apple on the tree after bloom has seeds in it. If the blossom wasn’t pollinated or the process didn’t fully complete, the seeds may not have been made. Most times those fruitlets without seeds won’t stay on the tree. Some apples will have just a seed or two on one side. Many times those will fall off too, but if perchance they stay on and grow, they will be misshapen, one side will be bigger than the other.

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Stress plays a role too. Not the stress that us growers are under, but the stress that the trees experience. Stress can be caused by drought, extreme heat, or an excessive number of fruits on the tree. Any of these can cause the tree to compensate by kicking some fruits off so it can better support the ones that are left. That is where the Gibberilins come in.

So how does the crop look this year? Well, we are still waiting for it to sort itself out. Some years what looks like a full crop dwindles greatly during June drop. In other years too many apples stay on and we spend a lot of time thinning them off by hand to improve quality. As you can see in the photos, there are all different sizes on the trees right now. Some smallest ones certainly will fall off by themselves. And the largest, healthiest ones should stay on and grow. But the jury is still out on those middle sized ones. Many of those that we cut open have no seeds, or the seeds are drying up. But others look just fine inside. What are we to do? We wait.

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Different sizes on the trees right now.


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The top 3 have dead or no seeds. Bottom 2 look good!

The same process occurs in our pears, plums and cherries too. Pears are finished and they look good! Cherries and plums are very close to completing the June drop and they look plentiful too. Peaches? They usually need a lot of hand thinning every year. A toilsome task in all it’s fuzziness (also see a earlier blog!). We are thinning peaches now. But apples will be sorting themselves out during the next couple of weeks and asking themselves: “Should I stay or should I go?” Stay tuned and we will all find out!

Have a fruitful week!

Tom Moelker

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2 thoughts on ““Should I stay or should I go?”

  1. Another well written, interesting blog. Great life analogies. God bless you with skill and wisdom as you care for your orchard. May He supply your needs.

    Liked by 1 person

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