Looking back.

Our farm has been in the family for 110 years as of 2017. That is a long time. It makes me wonder what Grandpa John Moelker would say if he could see the farm now. In some ways it is the same. The house, the lay of the land, the Grand River winding lazily across the west end of the farm. I’m sure some of it would still be familiar to him. Other things, of course would be vastly different from the farm he worked and knew well.

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The relationship between a farmer and his farm is an amazing thing. I often compare it to a person and his or her back yard, only bigger. You know where the weeds are in your lawn, which plants flower and when, and how much that one tree has grown since you moved in. You remember where Billy used to jump off the swing set, and where Susie would hide in the corner of the lot when she was angry. Each square foot of space holds a memory if you have lived somewhere for a long time.  For me it is the same, only on a larger scale. Since I have spent so many years on this farm, seeing most or all of it every day, subtle changes stand out to me and memories are everywhere.

 

We pushed out an orchard this year that was planted in 1975. I was 15 years old then. Which means that for most of my life since then, those trees have been under my care. And though it sounds crazy, each of those trees had its own characteristics that I could relate. That one tipped over in the early ’80’s during a hard wind and rain storm. This one, for some reason always produced apples that didn’t get very red. Those two trees always get ripe a few days before the rest. That tree, when it started bearing, was not a Red Delicious like it was suppose to be. It was an Early Blaze. Mislabeled at the nursery that sold it to us. On and on it goes. And it isn’t just trees and orchards that trigger these familiar thoughts. Places on the farm bring up memories too. That hollow tree in the woods that has had raccoons living in it for as long as I can remember. I was standing right here when I shot my first deer. Dad once got his tractor so stuck right here that it took every thing we had to pull it out. We laughed later, much later. It wasn’t funny then. I jumped out of the truck here once to try to stop a runaway wagon before it hit some apple trees. The wagon stopped on it’s own. The truck, however, was not in neutral when I bailed out, and it proceeded to mow down two apple trees before it stopped. I still can’t laugh about that one. The look on Dad’s face? Well let’s just say I didn’t say much the rest of that day!

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My dad ran this farm for a lot of the 110 years. And Grandpa did too, in the years before that. I’m sure that each of them had their own stories and ideas about interesting spots all over the farm. Funny how one piece of land can, over the years, evoke so many memories, good and bad. I think sometimes that if Grandpa, Dad,and I could sit down together and talk about the farm it would be an amazing conversation. I get tears in my eyes just picturing that scene. So many years of observations, memories and changes. Yet even after 110 years, some of it is still the same. And each day I add more thoughts and memories. Just like you do, in your back yard.

Have a fruitful week!

Tom Moelker

 

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Bakers gonna bake….

Our blog this week is written by my daughter, Tressa Moelker. Hope you enjoy it!  Tom.

I am always really excited when fruit season comes around because that means I get to start baking again! Baking started as my hobby and a way for me to relax. Now I get to do it every day as my job and I love it. Making the donuts and other goodies is fun, but I also love to see the smile on customer’s faces when they taste something I have made. It makes all of the long hours I spend in the bakery worthwhile.

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pc: Mindy Beck

This spring I graduated from college and I immediately started to experiment with new baked goods. Pies and breads were my focus. And my family had to taste it all. What a hard job :).

Finally, when I had narrowed it down to a few recipes, I invited a bunch of family and friends over to do a taste testing. It was a really fun time and it was a good way to get honest feedback about the pies. Now I have selected the best recipes and I am ready to start making them for you to try! This Saturday we are going to be having a bakery open house. We will be serving samples of the pie. They will also be available to buy frozen, so all you have to do is take them home and pop them into the oven. The added bonus is that you get to fill your home with the aroma of fresh baked pie!

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During all of this experimenting we also took time to expand our bakery. We needed more space to make the pies as well as our new Dutch Apple Bread. We are glad to be finished with the construction and are loving the new space. Make sure you come in this Saturday to check it all out and to get your taste of the pie!

As always, have a fruitful week!
Tressa Moelker

Just Peachy!

It’s peach season. That wonderful time of year when the fresh, juicy, and somewhat fragile fruit is at it’s best. When you get past the fuzziness, it is hard to beat the sweet yet tangy flavor of a peach! And the juice! It just runs down your chin! Oft times the most delectable foods are messy.

If you love peaches, and you have for years, you know the name Red Haven is the king of peaches here in Michigan. Since it was introduced in 1940, this flavorful peach has been the favorite of families year after year. Over the years a whole family of “Haven” peaches were introduced in our state.  The original Red Haven was developed at the Michigan State University Experiment Station at South Haven. Hence the name. I can remember  our farm growing many of them. Kal Haven, Hale Haven, Sun Haven, Rich Haven, Fair Haven, Crest Haven, Jay Haven, and Glo Haven peaches have grown on this farm over the years. Each of these varieties, while sharing the “Haven” name, were a little different  from the others. Some were early, some were mid-season, and some were late. All of them had great flavor and were “freestone”–the pit came away from the flesh easily. Most of those varieties have long been gone, but the Red Haven, once the most widely planted peach worldwide, is still the one every other peach is compared to.

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Hauling peaches in the 1930’s

I can remember why some of those varieties went away. Hale Haven, while a tasty peach, always fell off the tree the day before you picked them it seemed. Rich Haven and Sun Haven were as big as softballs, and seemed to ripen in the basket on the trip from the orchard to the house. They would be round when you picked them, and square when you got them home. Others, like Glo Haven and Crest Haven are good peaches that are still grown today. Unlike many other fruits, peaches have to be picked over 3 to 5 times, each time selecting the ripest fruits. That means going over the orchard every 2-3 days. It can be a hot, sticky and fuzzy job in the month of August! We are usually happy to begin peach picking season, and even happier to be finished with it!

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Hauling peaches today!

Michigan has always been kind of a hotbed of peach variety development. In recent years, whole families of peach varieties have been introduced. Paul Friday’s “Flamin’ Fury series boasts over 20 kinds of peaches that ripen over a 15 week long season in Michigan! Paul’s cousin Jim and his family have introduced the Stellar Series of peach varieties, over a dozen kinds whose names all end in “Star”(Glowingstar, for example). All of these great peaches are now available worldwide! And it all began in little old Michigan.

It is interesting how different states have different varieties of peaches. If you go to Georgia, for example, you will not recognize most of the kinds of peaches grown there. Names like “O’Henry”, “Cary Mac”, and “Rich Lady”. Really? Sounds funny to me. “I’d like a half bushel of those Rich Ladies!” Might be a good reason to get slapped! California and New Jersey also have entirely different kinds of peaches than what we have here. In fact, those three states, along with South Carolina, are the top peach growing states in America. While very few of those varieties are grown in Michigan, our state’s varieties are grown in many of the other states. While we don’t boast the big numbers, Michigan has a big influence with our research and development.

So with all of that peachy info, it’s time to get out there and enjoy! Because as summer slips toward fall, the season for this amazing fruit will slip away too. And there is nothing like a fresh peach sliced over ice cream on a warm August evening! Or a fresh warm slice of peach pie(also with ice cream, of course!)

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Have a fruitful (and peachy) week!

Tom Moelker