An eye for color.

Hi, I’m Tom, and I’m color blind. “Hi Tom.” All my life I’ve felt like there should be a support group for people like me. We could get together and tell, um, color stories. Like “So I came downstairs with this shirt on and my wife says:”You can’t wear THAT shirt with THOSE shorts!” Tell me about it. I’ve heard it all my life.

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I remember in school when the subject came up in biology class. There were these little images made of different color dots that we had to look at. “Regular” people saw the number “74” when they looked at the image. I just saw a bunch of dots. And then it began. “Moelker can’t see it! Hey, what do YOU see Moelker? What color is this? What color is this?” They could have sold tickets to that sideshow. After a while you learn to buy clothes in colors you can see. And you learn which shirts go with what pants, etc. But then you get clothes as a gift, or your wife buys you a new shirt and, well, you have to ask “What color is this?” or “What can I wear this with?” Fortunately I have an understanding wife who patiently helps me.

So I had learned to deal with the malady over the years. When my kids were little, they thought I only saw things in black and white! And then someone came up with the Gala apple. Now you have to know, in the old days we had apples that were red. Or yellow. Or green. But nooo, that wasn’t good enough. Now we have this Gala apple that is “…pink to magenta, with a background color that goes from light green to cream when it’s ready to pick.” Huh? I’m still trying to get the right shirt on in the morning and now my occupation is turning against me! And then it was Honeycrisp. And Pink Lady. All of a sudden you have to be Picasso just to pick an apple at the right time! And peaches! Don’t even get me started on peaches. I have actually learned to pick peaches by the feel and shape of them alone. You see, they get to be more round and less almond shaped when they are mature. And when you grasp them in your hand, they just feel right. I can’t explain it really.

And so it’s hard for me to teach someone else how to pick a peach or a Honeycrisp apple by looking at the color. I’ve given that task over to my wife and my kids, all of whom can see colors perfectly well. When it is time to begin picking Honeycrisp with a new crew of workers, My son or my wife (or both) come out and show the harvesters what the color requirements are. Most pick it up quickly. I’ve watched this instruction time and time again. I still don’t know what they’re talking about. “See the difference?” they ask. All the heads nod, “Yes.” Me? I just shrug my shoulders and look hard to see the number “74”.

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I do have one advantage though. If the sun ever goes out and we have to pick peaches in the dark, you guys will be lost. And I’ll be right at home, picking with my eyes closed!

Have a fruitful (and colorful) week!

Tom Moelker         tompic

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What’s Growing On?

Well our growing season has finally caught up. Back in the middle of April, we were running in between 3 and 4 weeks behind normal in accumulated temperature degree days. Since then we have slowly been gaining and our trees have been catching up in development due to some warmer than normal weeks. And by this weekend, we will have recovered all the way back to where we should be on average. This means the tree growth stages are now right where they usually are this time of year. Funny how all our fretting about early springs or late springs really doesn’t change anything. On the 1st of February we were 19 days ahead of normal. Then came the cold March and April that swung us the other way. And here we are now, right on time.

So what does right on time look like? Here are some photos of each kind of fruit, taken today.

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Sweet Cherry
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Apple

 

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Pear
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Peach
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Plum

Grafting update

Two weeks ago I wrote about grafting apple trees to change them from one variety to another. Since that was done, the little apple wood buds have woken up and are beginning to grow. That means the grafting process was successful! We don’t expect that every single one will succeed, but it’s good to see progress! Once these little shoots grow to 6 inches or so, we will remove about a third of the original tree so more of it’s resources can go to the new “adopted” branch. If this first season is successful, next spring we will remove all the rest of the original tree and the grafted shoot will become the new tree.

 

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The new shoot is starting!

It is always amazing to me to see how things grow. God makes trees to grow and produce fruit, and season after season, barring frost or other natural disasters, they will expend all their energy doing so. It’s what they were created to do. We should all take a lesson from them.

Have a fruitful week!

Tom Moelker       tompic

Just Peachy!

It’s peach season. That wonderful time of year when the fresh, juicy, and somewhat fragile fruit is at it’s best. When you get past the fuzziness, it is hard to beat the sweet yet tangy flavor of a peach! And the juice! It just runs down your chin! Oft times the most delectable foods are messy.

If you love peaches, and you have for years, you know the name Red Haven is the king of peaches here in Michigan. Since it was introduced in 1940, this flavorful peach has been the favorite of families year after year. Over the years a whole family of “Haven” peaches were introduced in our state.  The original Red Haven was developed at the Michigan State University Experiment Station at South Haven. Hence the name. I can remember  our farm growing many of them. Kal Haven, Hale Haven, Sun Haven, Rich Haven, Fair Haven, Crest Haven, Jay Haven, and Glo Haven peaches have grown on this farm over the years. Each of these varieties, while sharing the “Haven” name, were a little different  from the others. Some were early, some were mid-season, and some were late. All of them had great flavor and were “freestone”–the pit came away from the flesh easily. Most of those varieties have long been gone, but the Red Haven, once the most widely planted peach worldwide, is still the one every other peach is compared to.

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Hauling peaches in the 1930’s

I can remember why some of those varieties went away. Hale Haven, while a tasty peach, always fell off the tree the day before you picked them it seemed. Rich Haven and Sun Haven were as big as softballs, and seemed to ripen in the basket on the trip from the orchard to the house. They would be round when you picked them, and square when you got them home. Others, like Glo Haven and Crest Haven are good peaches that are still grown today. Unlike many other fruits, peaches have to be picked over 3 to 5 times, each time selecting the ripest fruits. That means going over the orchard every 2-3 days. It can be a hot, sticky and fuzzy job in the month of August! We are usually happy to begin peach picking season, and even happier to be finished with it!

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Hauling peaches today!

Michigan has always been kind of a hotbed of peach variety development. In recent years, whole families of peach varieties have been introduced. Paul Friday’s “Flamin’ Fury series boasts over 20 kinds of peaches that ripen over a 15 week long season in Michigan! Paul’s cousin Jim and his family have introduced the Stellar Series of peach varieties, over a dozen kinds whose names all end in “Star”(Glowingstar, for example). All of these great peaches are now available worldwide! And it all began in little old Michigan.

It is interesting how different states have different varieties of peaches. If you go to Georgia, for example, you will not recognize most of the kinds of peaches grown there. Names like “O’Henry”, “Cary Mac”, and “Rich Lady”. Really? Sounds funny to me. “I’d like a half bushel of those Rich Ladies!” Might be a good reason to get slapped! California and New Jersey also have entirely different kinds of peaches than what we have here. In fact, those three states, along with South Carolina, are the top peach growing states in America. While very few of those varieties are grown in Michigan, our state’s varieties are grown in many of the other states. While we don’t boast the big numbers, Michigan has a big influence with our research and development.

So with all of that peachy info, it’s time to get out there and enjoy! Because as summer slips toward fall, the season for this amazing fruit will slip away too. And there is nothing like a fresh peach sliced over ice cream on a warm August evening! Or a fresh warm slice of peach pie(also with ice cream, of course!)

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Have a fruitful (and peachy) week!

Tom Moelker